Emotional Pain – To Heal It We Need to Acknowledge It, by Kai at wellbeingalignment.com

“Most of us were conditioned to believe that it isn’t okay to feel our feelings, especially the really strong emotions that threatened our caregivers’ world when we expressed them. So, sometimes unconsciously and with good intentions, they did whatever they could to influence us to bury the feelings.”

“As you begin to experience your emotional pain, remind yourself that there is nothing wrong with you for having this wound. Even if your current experience was triggered by something in present time, the root of it is there because there was something that happened to you in the past that caused real, genuine pain. Therefore, it is normal, natural and HEALTHY for you to feel whatever it is that you feel.”

“You don’t need to figure out or decide what something means, whether it is something someone said or did or something you said or did, or a feeling you’re becoming aware of. Mental analysis diverts you off track and into the mind, which won’t be useful in acknowledging the emotional pain. Remember, our intention here is to acknowledge and feel the FEELING.”

Here you can read the whole article, which can be very helpful for emotional healing processes and affirming in general:

http://www.wellbeingalignment.com/emotional-pain.html

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Fifteen Common Defense Mechanisms by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

“In some areas of psychology (especially in psychodynamic theory), psychologists talk about “defense mechanisms” or manners in which we behave or think in certain ways to better protect or “defend” ourselves. Defense mechanisms are one way of looking at how people distance themselves from a full awareness of unpleasant thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

Psychologists have categorized defense mechanisms based upon how primitive they are. The more primitive a defense mechanism, the less effective it works for a person over the long-term. However, more primitive defense mechanisms are usually very effective short-term, and hence are favored by many people and children especially (when such primitive defense mechanisms are first learned). Adults who don’t learn better ways of coping with stress or traumatic events in their lives will often resort to such primitive defense mechanisms as well.

Most defense mechanisms are fairly unconscious – that means most of us don’t realize we’re using them in the moment. Some types of psychotherapy can help a person become aware of what defense mechanisms they are using, how effective they are, and how to use less primitive and more effective mechanisms in the future.”

Here is the article: 15 Common Defense Mechanisms  /psychcentral.com  (click the blue title)

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