Article: Fifteen Common Cognitive Distortions by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

“What’s a cognitive distortion and why do so many people have them? Cognitive distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn’t really true. These inaccurate thoughts are usually used to reinforce negative thinking or emotions — telling ourselves things that sound rational and accurate, but really only serve to keep us feeling bad about ourselves.” Here is the article: http://psychcentral.com/lib/15-common-cognitive-distortions/0002153

 

Image: Crystal Mind /Nevit Dilmen, Wikimedia Commons

Quotes from Alice the Adventurer

alice_in_wonderland_movie_2010-wallpaper-1366x768If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?

It’s always tea-time.
  
Jam tomorrow and jam yesterday, but never jam today.  – Mad Hatter.

It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards, says the White Queen to Alice.

I can’t go back to yesterday because I was a different person then.

Alice: [looking through the Doorknob’s keyhole] There he is! I simply must get through.
Doorknob: Sorry. You’re much too big. Simply impassable.
Alice: You mean impossible.
Doorknob: No, impassable. (chuckles) Nothing’s impossible!

― Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures

 

Image: alice in wonderland movie 2010 /worldpaperswide.com

Articles: Divergent and Convergent Thinking

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Click the green links of this little article puzzle to read the whole articles.

From the article: How to Understand Divergent Thinking and Convergent Thinking Michael J. Motta /voices.yahoo.com:

Convergent thinking and divergent thinking might sound complicated on the surface, and they can be when practiced, but as concepts they are fairly simple. Both styles of thought are employed in problem solving, and each may complement the other. In this article you will learn the difference between convergent thinking and divergent thinking, and also how the two types may best complement each other.

1. Understand Convergent Thinking

This is perhaps the more predominant style of thinking in contemporary technological society. In convergent thought, we locate a problem at the “center” of our focus and then gather peripheral resources to bear down on the problem. So then our resources “converge” on the problem. Often times with convergent thinking, there is a single best solution that is sought. An example of convergent thinking might involve taking a multiple choice test in which there is a single “correct” answer. The test-taker brings knowledge from outside of the problem (perhaps learned in a course) and converges it all onto the problem in order to choose the correct answer.

“The deductive logic that the fictional character Sherlock Holmes used is a good convergent thinking example. Gathering various tidbits of facts and data he was able to put the pieces of a puzzle together and come up with a logical answer to the question: Who done it?” – From the article: Convergent Thinking,  Chuck Clayton /articlecity.com

2. Understand Divergent Thinking

Divergent thinking involves some stimulus, which can take the form of a problem, and we can locate this at the center, as we did with convergent thinking above. However, the procedure is different. Rather than gathering information and converging it on the central problem, we branch off (diverge) and shoot for novel ideas, new perspectives and creativity. Instead of a single correct answer, there may be a whole host of possibilities. An example of using divergent thinking might involve taking an open-ended test that asks how many uses one can imagine for various (often mundane) objects. What can you do with a pencil? A string? A rock?

“Einstein was a strong divergent thinker. He asked simple questions and then did mental exercises to solve problems. For example, as a young man Einstein asked himself what it would be like to ride on a beam of light. It took him many years of thought experiments, however the answer helped him develop the special theory of relativity. Thought experiments are imagined scenarios to understand the way things are.” – From the article: Convergent Thinking,  Chuck Clayton /articlecity.com

“Divergent thinking opens the imagination to all possibilities, while convergent thinking analyzes and chooses from among those possibilities. In a sense, divergent and convergent thinking are the Yin and Yang of creative problem solving. Neither is superior to the other – simply more appropriate for the task at hand.” – From the article: The Power of Divergent and Convergent Thinking – Guide Your Group’s Thinking Process to New Heights By Keith Harmeyer /ezinearticles.com

 

“In their book Breakpoint and Beyond, George Land and Beth Jarman describe a longitudinal study they conducted on 1,600 kindergarden children aged three to five. They gave them eight tests on divergent thinking and an astonishing 98 per cent of the children scored within the creative genius category.

Five years later, they re-tested the same children, now aged eight to 10 and only 32 per cent scored in the creative genius category. Five years later only 10 per cent of the children scored in this category. In tests of over 200,000 adults over 25, only two per cent scored enough to be classified as creative geniuses.

Divergent thinking tests measure an individual’s ability to generate multiple approaches to solving a problem. The tests typically use simple questions such as: what are the uses for a flower pot?

An average person would have 10 to 15 answers to this question. A genius of divergent thinking would come up with a hundred possible answers, and they do this by changing the concepts of already existing thinking – can the flower pot be 10 metres wide, or can it be made of rubber, and so forth.

So what really happens with the universal mental capability to think divergently? What happened to those 160,000 children during their school years?

The classic school model encourages students to adopt fixed mental models of how things work, discouraging creative thinking and problem solving. Mastering other people’s mental models seems to kill an individual’s ability to think divergently and wonder creatively.

We are all born with this capacity to think creatively but duringthe years of schooling, this capability deteriorates drastically.

Images: ddpavumba, samuiblue /freedigitalphotos.net

Fascinating Reminders for the Day: All Is Vibration

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“Quantum physics has taught us that there is no such thing as empty space, and that the so-called vacuum of space often called the Zero Point Field (ZPF), is teeming with quantum fluctuations that display a resonance, a vibration. Nothing does not vibrate. There is no such thing as zero, dead, still. Everything that exists gives off some vibration of a certain frequency.

Every planet, every person, every particle.

Musicians know that when a guitar string is plucked on one instrument in a music store, all the other guitars in the same room will vibrate to that tone. Healers refer to this as “entrainment,” when two objects (or people!) in close proximity, vibrating on different frequencies, begin altering their vibrations until they are vibrating at the same, or nearly the same, frequency. The Zero Point Field could act as a field of “entrainment” or resonance, where the vibrations of particles tune to specific frequencies, creating different forms of matter, energy and interactions.”

“Advanced physics tells us that an event at Point A in the universe does not cause an event in Point B to occur a little later. Actually, both events occur at the same time. Carl Jung used the term “synchronicity” to describe this same phenomenon on a human level. In his amazing book Power Vs. Force, Dr. David R. Hawkins states that a “question can’t be asked unless there’s already the potentiality of the answer… there can be no ‘up’ without an already existent ‘down’.” Synchronicities are evidence of an all-inclusive field that goes against the normal cause-and-effect rationale for events that occur that challenge our illusion of the line between subjective and objective reality.”

Here is the whole article:  Consciousness, Resonance & the Paranormal: Synchronised Swimming in the Quantum Sea By Marie D. Jones © New Dawn Magazine and the respective author, http://www.newdawnmagazine.com

 

Images: sattva /freedigitalphotos.net

Expanding Mind over Matter: Death as an Illusion, a Scientific View

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“You would not exist without a consciousness. One of the reasons Robert Lanza thinks you will not die, is because you are not a object. You’re a special being. According to biocentrism, nothing could exist without consciousness. Remember you can’t see through the bone surrounding your brain.

Space and time are not hard objects, but rather the tools our mind uses to weave everything together.

Everything you see and experience right now is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Lanzer points out that death does not exists in a timeless, spaceless world.

There is no distinction between past, present, and future. It is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.

Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time without end, but rather resides outside of time altogether.

Albert Einstein once said: “Reality is merely an illusion, although a very persistent one.”

How can we tell what is real and not? How can we with certainty know that our brain is not giving us the illusion of a physical world?”

You can read the whole article here: Death Is Just An Illusion: We Continue To Live In A Parallel Universe /MessagetoEagle.com

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Images: 1. Kookkai_nak, 2.Dan  /freedigitalphotos.net